Wow! What a catch! If you consider yourself to an outdoor enthusiast, you’re likely always on the hunt for the next big adrenaline rush.

Many people do not see fishing as overly exciting. This is simply a misconception. The problem is that they’re unwilling to leave the shore.

If you’re serious about upping the intensity and want to enjoy the most thrilling fishing experience ever, you should grab a kayak and head to the water. Salmon are plentiful and they make for a great challenge.

Below, I am going to teach you how to experience the ultimate excitement of catching a big salmon from your kayak.

   

Salmon Are Widely Available

Fishing can be tedious, when you’re after a specific species of fish. In many cases, you’ll be forced to venture over a great distance to find a suitable lake.

This is generally not the case with salmon. These fish are not picky! In fact, they’re capable of living in fresh and saltwater.

Salmon head out to the freshwater to reproduce, before returning to the ocean. This makes fishing for salmon more convenient than other species.

Whether you’re after Atlantic Salmon or Chinook Salmon, you should have little to no trouble finding a suitable fishing spot in your local area. This all, but guarantees, that you can fish for salmon in your kayak almost any day of the week.

Keep Hooks Sharpen

While salmon are definitely easier to catch than other fish, they still have a few tricks up their sleeve.

For starters, salmon are known for having very thick jaws. This can make it far more difficult to set your hook.

Before heading out to the lake, it is pertinent to make sure your hooks have been sharpened to perfection. Whether you’re like Valerie the fly fisherwoman or want to fish from your kayak like me, you’ll enjoy your experience far more with super sharp hooks.

Overcast Days Are Best

As an avid salmon fisherman, I can tell you with surety that salmon absolutely love overcast days. If the sun is shining bright, you’re probably going to have a difficult time finding salmon.

Salmon tend to be more active in low light environments. Therefore, it is often best to wait for an overcast day, before heading out.

Also, you can fish around dawn or dusk to increase your overall productivity. If you’re adamant about fishing on a sunny day, you’re going to need to sink your lure deeper into the water.

And of course, you’ll need to be far more patient. Salmon are lazy on sunny days. So, twiddle your thumbs and wait for a bite.

Choosing The Right Kayak For Salmon Fishing

Are you a lover of salmon fishing? Are you thinking about expanding your horizons and opening up a whole new world or salmon fishing by purchasing a kayak?

Kayaks are smaller and more versatile, which allows users to easier maneuver them into coves and places that you cannot reach from standing on a bank or in a larger boat.

However, I can tell you from experience that fishing for salmon from a kayak is a whole different sport and the reason for this is because salmon are found in moving water.

Since kayaks are smaller and narrower watercrafts than boats, moving waters combined with wind can really wreak havoc on your kayak.

In order to get the most out of your experience, I would recommend investing in a kayak that is at least 9.5-11 feet long with a flat bottom.

Along with this, your kayak should be capable of handling varying water depths, speeds, and maneuverable enough to handle class 2 rapids. It is highly recommended that you check out South Texas Kayak, which offers a wealth of information regarding kayak styles and their benefits.

Drift Fishing

Lots of kayak fishermen enjoy drift fishing, because it does not require as much stamina as fly-fishing and other common methods of fishing. Drift fishing is extremely easy to accomplish and can be done very easily from a kayak.

All you need to do is find a steady current, cast your line upstream, let it drift back down through the pool and start reeling it in. Once the line is reeled in, you will just repeat the process over and over again until you yield a large catch. 

I normally weight my setup, so it will bounce along the bottom and touch about every foot at the same speed of the current. Just remember that more weight will slow down the speed of the drift, while less weight will speed it up.

Once you become familiar with the method, you will be able to choose which weight best suits your needs and preferences.

Spoon Lure

When I am fishing for salmon, I prefer to utilize the spoon lure, which has a hollow, elongated oval shape that is attached to a sharp hook. The “spoon” is constructed out of painted or reflective metal and resembles a tiny fish.

When the lure moves along the water, it mimics a fluttering movement that will attract the fish. If you enjoy downrigger or trolling fishing, you will probably be familiar with the spoon lure.

Spoon lures offer many benefits including:

  • Affordability
  • Well-balanced
  • Super reflective effect

Suitable for beginners and experienced anglers

Keeping Your Salmon

One of the most exciting things about catching salmon is taking the trophy home.

In order to catch and keep your salmon, you’ll need your fishing license and a special permit. Trust me, you’re going to want to get both, before you even set out on the water.

If you do not have both and get caught, you’re going to face a hefty fine. The cost of such permits is typically used for conversation efforts. Get a fishing license at one of the following location.

  • Convenience stores
  • Tackle shops
  • Shops near the pier
  • Hunting supply retailers
  • Courthouse

So, you should not look at this as a punishment. Help replenish the salmon population by obeying the rules and paying for a permit.

Author Bio:

Jeff is a fishing and kayaking enthusiast, a proud father and an avid Houston Astros fan. Jeff created his kayak fishing blog southtexaskayak.com early 2016 with a plan to provide useful information and resources for kayak fishing, canoeing and fishing in general to new anglers. A longtime passion turning into a new career with the help of his son Kevin. You can email Jeff at info@southtexaskayak.com.

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